Seeing Through Statistics 4th edition

Textbook Cover

Jessica M. Utts
Publisher: Cengage Learning

eBook

eBook

Your students can pay an additional fee for access to an online version of the textbook that might contain additional interactive features.

course pack

Course Packs

Save time with ready-to-use assignments built by subject matter experts specifically for this textbook. You can customize and schedule any of the assignments you want to use.

textbook resources

Textbook Resources

Additional instructional and learning resources are available with the textbook, and might include testbanks, slide presentations, online simulations, videos, and documents.


  • Utts Seeing through Statistics 4e
  • Utts Seeing through Statistics 4e - Aplia

Access is contingent on use of this textbook in the instructor's classroom.

Academic Term Homework and eBook
Higher Education Single Term $90.00
High School $35.00

Online price per student per course or lab, bookstore price varies. Access cards can be packaged with most any textbook, please see your textbook rep or contact WebAssign

  • Chapter 1: The Benefits and Risks of Using Statistics
    • 1: Stats in Practice Video Question (4)
    • 1.1: Why Bother Reading This Book?
    • 1.2: What is Statistics All About?
    • 1.3: Detecting Patterns and Relationships
    • 1.4: Don't Be Deceived by Improper Use of Statistics
    • 1.5: Summary and Conclusions
    • 1: Exercises (27)
    • 1: Concept Questions (6)
    • 1: Labs
    • 1: Test Bank

  • Chapter 2: Reading the News
    • 2: Stats in Practice Video Question
    • 2.1: The Educated Consumer of Data
    • 2.2: Origins of News Stories
    • 2.3: How to be a Statistics Sleuth: Seven Critical Components
    • 2.4: Four Hypothetical Examples of Bad Reports
    • 2.5: Planning Your Own Study: Defining the Components in Advance
    • 2: Exercises (17)
    • 2: Concept Questions
    • 2: Labs
    • 2: Test Bank (9)

  • Chapter 3: Measurements, Mistakes, and Misunderstandings
    • 3: Stats in Practice Video Question (2)
    • 3.1: Simple Measures Don't Exist
    • 3.2: It's All in the Wording
    • 3.3: Open or Closed Questions: Should Choices Be Given?
    • 3.4: Defining What Is Being Measured
    • 3.5: Defining a Common Language
    • 3: Exercises (45)
    • 3: Concept Questions (10)
    • 3: Labs
    • 3: Test Bank (7)

  • Chapter 4: How to Get a Good Sample
    • 4: Stats in Practice Video Question
    • 4.1: Common Research Strategies
    • 4.2: Defining a Common Language
    • 4.3: The Beauty of Sampling
    • 4.4: Simple Random Sampling
    • 4.5: Other Sampling Methods
    • 4.6: Difficulties and Disasters in Sampling
    • 4: Exercises (40)
    • 4: Concept Questions (16)
    • 4: Labs (6)
    • 4: Test Bank (10)

  • Chapter 5: Experiments and Observational Studies
    • 5: Stats in Practice Video Question
    • 5.1: Defining a Common Language
    • 5.2: Designing a Good Experiment
    • 5.3: Difficulties and Disasters in Experiments
    • 5.4: Designing a Good Observational Experiment
    • 5.5: Difficulties and Disasters in Observational Studies
    • 5.6: Random Sample versus Random Assignment
    • 5: Exercises (46)
    • 5: Concept Questions (20)
    • 5: Labs
    • 5: Test Bank (9)

  • Chapter 6: Getting the Big Picture
    • 6: Stats in Practice Video Question
    • 6.1: Final Questions
    • 6: Exercises
    • 6: Concept Questions
    • 6: Labs
    • 6: Test Bank (8)

  • Chapter 7: Summarizing and Displaying Measurement Data
    • 7: Stats in Practice Video Question (1)
    • 7.1: Turning Data into Information
    • 7.2: Picturing Data: Stemplots and Histograms
    • 7.3: Five Useful Numbers: A Summary
    • 7.4: Boxplots
    • 7.5: Traditional Measures: Mean, Variance, and Standard Deviation
    • 7.6: Caution: Being Average Isn't Normal
    • 7: Exercises (50)
    • 7: JMP Simulations (12)
    • 7: Concept Questions (22)
    • 7: Labs
    • 7: Test Bank (9)

  • Chapter 8: Bell-Shaped Curves and Other Shapes
    • 8: Stats in Practice Video Question
    • 8.1: Populations, Frequency Curves, and Proportions
    • 8.2: The Pervasiveness of Normal Curves
    • 8.3: Percentiles and Standardized Scores
    • 8.4: z-Scores and Familiar Intervals
    • 8: Exercises (32)
    • 8: JMP Simulations (4)
    • 8: Concept Questions (14)
    • 8: Labs (11)
    • 8: Test Bank (8)

  • Chapter 9: Plots, Graphs, and Pictures
    • 9: Stats in Practice Video Question (1)
    • 9.1: Well-Designed Statistical Pictures
    • 9.2: Pictures of Categorical Data
    • 9.3: Pictures of Measurement Variables
    • 9.4: Pictures of Trends across Time
    • 9.5: Difficulties and Disasters in Plots, Graphs, and Pictures
    • 9.6: A Checklist for Statistical Pictures
    • 9: Exercises (30)
    • 9: JMP Simulations (4)
    • 9: Concept Questions (6)
    • 9: Labs (5)
    • 9: Test Bank (8)

  • Chapter 10: Relationships Between Measurement Variables
    • 10: Stats in Practice Video Question (3)
    • 10.1: Statistical Relationships
    • 10.2: Strength versus Statistical Significance
    • 10.3: Measuring Strength Through Correlation
    • 10.4: Specifying Linear Relationships with Regression
    • 10: Exercises (34)
    • 10: JMP Simulations (7)
    • 10: Concept Questions (10)
    • 10: Labs
    • 10: Test Bank (9)

  • Chapter 11: Relationships Can Be Deceiving
    • 11: Stats in Practice Video Question
    • 11.1: Illegitimate Correlations
    • 11.2: Legitimate Correlation Does Not Imply Causation
    • 11.3: Some Reasons for Relationships Between Variables
    • 11.4: Confirming Causation
    • 11: Exercises (34)
    • 11: Concept Questions
    • 11: Labs
    • 11: Test Bank (7)

  • Chapter 12: Relationships Between Categorical Variables
    • 12: Stats in Practice Video Question
    • 12.1: Displaying Relationships Between Categorical Variables: Contingency Tables
    • 12.2: Relative Risk, Increased Risk, and Odds
    • 12.3: Misleading Statistics about Risk
    • 12.4: Simpson's Paradox: The Missing Third Variable
    • 12: Exercises (38)
    • 12: Concept Questions
    • 12: Labs
    • 12: Test Bank (7)

  • Chapter 13: Statistical Significance for 2 × 2 Tables
    • 13: Stats in Practice Video Question (1)
    • 13.1: Measuring the Strength of the Relationship
    • 13.2: Steps for Assessing Statistical Significance
    • 13.3: The Chi-Square Test
    • 13.4: Practical versus Statistical Significance
    • 13: Exercises (40)
    • 13: JMP Simulations (3)
    • 13: Concept Questions (4)
    • 13: Labs (6)
    • 13: Test Bank (7)

  • Chapter 14: Understanding Probability and Long-Term Expectations
    • 14: Stats in Practice Video Question
    • 14.1: Probability
    • 14.2: The Relative-Frequency Interpretation
    • 14.3: The Personal-Probability Interpretation
    • 14.4: Applying Some Simple Probability Rules
    • 14.5: When Will It Happen?
    • 14.6: Long-Term Gains, Losses, and Expectations
    • 14: Exercises (36)
    • 14: JMP Simulations (4)
    • 14: Concept Questions (13)
    • 14: Labs
    • 14: Test Bank (9)

  • Chapter 15: Understanding Uncertainty through Simulation
    • 15: Stats in Practice Video Question
    • 15.1: Mimicking Reality through Simulation
    • 15.2: Simulating Probabilities
    • 15.3: Simulating the Chi-Square Test
    • 15.4: Randomization Tests
    • 15: Exercises (25)
    • 15: Concept Questions (3)
    • 15: Labs
    • 15: Test Bank

  • Chapter 16: Psychological Influences on Personal Probability
    • 16: Stats in Practice Video Question
    • 16.1: Revisiting Personal Probability
    • 16.2: Equivalent Probabilities; Different Decisions
    • 16.3: How Personal Probabilities Can Be Distorted
    • 16.4: Optimism, Reluctance to Change, and Overconfidence
    • 16.5: Calibrating Personal Probabilities of Experts
    • 16.6: Tips for Improving Your Personal Probabilities and Judgments
    • 16: Exercises (24)
    • 16: Concept Questions
    • 16: Labs
    • 16: Test Bank

  • Chapter 17: When Intuition Differs from Relative Frequency
    • 17: Stats in Practice Video Question
    • 17.1: Revisiting Relative Frequency
    • 17.2: Coincidences
    • 17.3: The Gambler's Fallacy
    • 17.4: Confusion of the Inverse
    • 17.5: Using Expected Values to Make Wise Decisions
    • 17: Exercises (27)
    • 17: Concept Questions (2)
    • 17: Labs
    • 17: Test Bank (7)

  • Chapter 18: Understanding the Economic News
    • 18: Stats in Practice Video Question
    • 18.1: Cost of Living: The Consumer Price Index
    • 18.2: Uses of the Consumer Price Index
    • 18.3: Criticisms of the Consumer Price Index
    • 18.4: Seasonal Adjustments: Reporting the Consumer Price Index
    • 18.5: Economic Indicators
    • 18: Exercises (25)
    • 18: Concept Questions
    • 18: Labs
    • 18: Test Bank

  • Chapter 19: The Diversity of Samples from the Same Population
    • 19: Stats in Practice Video Question (1)
    • 19.1: Setting the Stage
    • 19.2: What to Expect of Sample Proportions
    • 19.3: What to Expect of Sample Means
    • 19.4: What to Expect in Other Situations
    • 19.5: Simulated Proportions and Means
    • 19: Exercises (21)
    • 19: Concept Questions (8)
    • 19: Labs (6)
    • 19: Test Bank (6)

  • Chapter 20: Estimating Proportions with Confidence
    • 20: Stats in Practice Video Question
    • 20.1: Confidence Intervals
    • 20.2: Three Examples of Confidence Intervals from the Media
    • 20.3: Constructing a Confidence Interval for a Proportion
    • 20: Exercises (27)
    • 20: JMP Simulations (3)
    • 20: Concept Questions
    • 20: Labs (6)
    • 20: Test Bank (5)

  • Chapter 21: The Role of Confidence Intervals in Research
    • 21: Stats in Practice Video Question (1)
    • 21.1: Confidence Intervals for Populations Means
    • 21.2: Confidence Intervals for the Difference Between Two Means
    • 21.3: Revisiting Case Studies and Examples: How Journals Present Confidence Intervals
    • 21.4: Understanding Any Confidence Interval
    • 21: Exercises (33)
    • 21: JMP Simulations (14)
    • 21: Concept Questions (12)
    • 21: Labs (12)
    • 21: Test Bank (5)

  • Chapter 22: Rejecting Chance—Testing Hypotheses in Research
    • 22: Stats in Practice Video Question (3)
    • 22.1: Using Data to Make Decisions
    • 22.2: The Basic Steps for Testing Hypotheses
    • 22.3: Testing Hypotheses for Proportions
    • 22.4: What Can Go Wrong: The Two Types of Errors
    • 22: Exercises (27)
    • 22: JMP Simulations (6)
    • 22: Concept Questions
    • 22: Labs
    • 22: Test Bank (5)

  • Chapter 23: Hypothesis Testing—Examples and Case Studies
    • 23: Stats in Practice Video Question (3)
    • 23.1: How Hypothesis Tests Are Reported in the News
    • 23.2: Testing Hypotheses about Proportions and Means
    • 23.3: How Journals Present Hypothesis Tests
    • 23: Exercises (33)
    • 23: JMP Simulations (14)
    • 23: Concept Questions (18)
    • 23: Labs (12)
    • 23: Test Bank (4)

  • Chapter 24: Significance, Importance, and Undetected Differences
    • 24: Stats in Practice Video Question
    • 24.1: Real Importance versus Statistical Significance
    • 24.2: The Role of Sample Size in Statistical Significance
    • 24.3: No Difference versus No Statistically Significant Difference
    • 24.4: Multiple Tests, Multiple Comparisons, and False Positives
    • 24.5: A Summary of Warnings and Key Concepts
    • 24: Exercises (32)
    • 24: Concept Questions
    • 24: Labs
    • 24: Test Bank (6)

  • Chapter 25: Meta-Analysis: Resolving Inconsistencies across Studies
    • 25: Stats in Practice Video Question
    • 25.1: The Need for Meta-Analysis
    • 25.2: Two Important Decisions for the Analyst
    • 25.3: Some Benefits of Meta-Analysis
    • 25.4: Criticisms of Meta-Analysis
    • 25: Exercises (16)
    • 25: Concept Questions
    • 25: Labs
    • 25: Test Bank

  • Chapter 26: Ethics in Statistical Studies
    • 26: Stats in Practice Video Question
    • 26.1: Ethical Treatment of Human and Animal Participants
    • 26.2: Assurance of Data Quality
    • 26.3: Appropriate Statistical Analyses
    • 26.4: Fair Reporting of Results
    • 26: Exercises (21)
    • 26: Concept Questions
    • 26: Labs
    • 26: Test Bank

  • Chapter 27: Putting What You Have Learned to the Test
    • 27: Test Bank (6)

  • Chapter PJT: Project
    • PJT.1: Project (4)


Seeing through Statistics, 4th edition, by Jessica Utts develops statistical literacy and critical thinking through real-world applications, with an emphasis on ideas, not calculations. This text focuses on the key concepts that educated citizens need to know about statistics. These ideas are introduced in interesting applied and real contexts, without using an abundance of technicalities and calculations that only serve to confuse students. The WebAssign component for this text engages students with an interactive eBook and several other resources.

New for Fall 2019!


Platform Updates


Instructor Product Features

  • Questions from Aplia: 100% of questions formerly provided through Aplia are now available in WebAssign to maintain course consistency for previous Aplia users.
  • Course Packs with ready-to-use assignments were built by subject matter experts specifically for this textbook. They are designed to save you time, and can be easily customized to meet your teaching goals. Course Packs include Stats in Practice Video Questions, Labs, JMP Questions, and Project Milestones.
  • Instructor Resources include Instructional Lecture Videos, hosted by Dana Mosely. These topic-specific videos provide explanations of key concepts, examples, and applications in a lecture-based format. Lecture PowerPoint slides are also available.

Student Learning Tools

  • Read It links under each question quickly jump to the corresponding section of a complete, interactive eBook that lets students highlight and take notes as they read.
  • Student Resources include Data Analysis Tool Instructions / Tech Guides for the below software. Can be used stand-alone or in conjunction with assessment items (Homework, Labs, or Project Milestones).
    • TI-83/84 and TI-Nspire Calculator
    • Excel
    • JMP
    • Minitab
    • SPSS
    • R

Questions to Help Students Gain Interest and Conceptual Understanding

  • Stats in Practice Video Questions (SIP) show students how Statistics applies in the real world. Short and current news videos introduce each module. Each video is accompanied by multiple-choice and discussion questions, so that students can understand real-world context of what they're learning and stay engaged throughout the whole module.
  • Concept Questions (CQ) provide a new way of engaging with non-computational questions. Students enter a free response before they choose a multiple-choice answer, closing the gap between homework and test preparedness.

Tools to Explore Real Data with Technology

  • Simulation Questions by JMP (JMP): Have your students understand concepts by utilizing real data. Students must discover the answer to guided questions by interacting with a simulation of real data in our JMP interactive applet within WebAssign.
  • Labs (Lab): Students can perform real statistical analysis in class or online with premade and module-specific Stats Labs. Require students to use the instructor-selected data analysis tool to analyze a real data set, pulling together knowledge learned from that module and previous material to facilitate whole-picture learning.
  • Project Milestones (PJT): Allow one place for students to ideate, collaborate, and submit a longer-term project. The four sequential milestones are:
    1. Research Design
    2. Gather Data
    3. Analyze Data
    4. Present Results


Questions Available within WebAssign

Most questions from this textbook are available in WebAssign. The online questions are identical to the textbook questions except for minor wording changes necessary for Web use. Whenever possible, variables, numbers, or words have been randomized so that each student receives a unique version of the question. This list is updated nightly.

Question Group Key
SIP - Stats in Practice Video Question
JMP - Simulation Question by JMP
CQ - Concept Question
Lab - Lab
PJT - Project Milestone
TB - Test Bank


Question Availability Color Key
BLACK questions are available now
GRAY questions are under development


Group Quantity Questions
Chapter PJT: Project
PJT.1 4 001 002 003 004
Chapter 1: The Benefits and Risks of Using Statistics
1.CQ 6 001 002 003 004 005 006
1.E 27 001 002 003 004 005 006 007 008 009 010 011 012 013 015 016 017 018 019 020 021 022 023 024 501.XP 502.XP 503.XP 504.XP
1.SIP 4 001 002 003 004
Chapter 2: Reading the News
2.E 17 001 002 003 004 005 006 007 008 009 012 013 014 015 016 017 018 501.XP
2.TB 9 006 016 017 025 029 036 046 047 049
Chapter 3: Measurements, Mistakes, and Misunderstandings
3.CQ 10 001 002 003 004 005 006 007 008 009 010
3.E 45 001 002 003 004 006 007 008 009 010 011 012 013 014 015 016 017 018 019 021 022 023 024 025 026 027 028 029 030 032 033 034 035 036 037 038 039 040 041 042 043 501.XP 502.XP 503.XP 504.XP 505.XP
3.SIP 2 001 002
3.TB 7 003 011 022 023 029 040 043
Chapter 4: How to Get a Good Sample
4.CQ 16 001 002 003 004 005 006 007 008 009 010 011 012 013 014 015 016
4.E 40 001 002 003 004 005 006 007 008 009 010 011 012 013 014 015 017 018 020 021 022 023 024 025 026 027 028 029 030 031 032 033 035 036 037 038 501.XP 502.XP 503.XP 504.XP 505.XP
4.Lab 6 001.Excel 001.JMP 001.Minitab 001.R 001.SPSS 001.TI
4.TB 10 006 008 018 019 020 025 030 039 048 055
Chapter 5: Experiments and Observational Studies
5.CQ 20 001 002 003 004 005 006 007 008 009 010 011 012 013 014 015 016 017 018 019 020
5.E 46 001 002 003 004 005 006 007 008 009 010 011 012 013 014 015 016 017 018 019 021 022 023 024 025 026 027 028 029 030 031 032 033 034 035 036 037 038 039 040 041 042 043 501.XP 502.XP 503.XP 504.XP
5.TB 9 008 015 019 025 036 039 045 055 056
Chapter 6: Getting the Big Picture
6.TB 8 008 009 012 013 017 018 021 022
Chapter 7: Summarizing and Displaying Measurement Data
7.CQ 22 001 002 003 004 005 006 007 008 009 010 011 012 013 014 015 016 017 018 019 020 021 022
7.E 50 001 002 003 004 005 006 007 008 009 010 011 012 013 014 015 016 017 018 019 020 021 022 023 024 026 027 029 030 031 032 033 034 035 036 037 038 039 040 041 042 044 045 501.XP 502.XP 503.XP 504.XP 505.XP 506.XP 507.XP 508.XP
7.JMP 12 001 002 003 004 005 006 007 008 009 010 011 012
7.SIP 1 001
7.TB 9 005 007 009 015 025 035 040 045 050
Chapter 8: Bell-Shaped Curves and Other Shapes
8.CQ 14 001 002 003 004 005 006 007 008 009 010 011 012 013 014
8.E 32 001 002 003 004 005 006 007 008 009 010 011 012 013 014 015 017 018 019 020 021 023 024 025 026 027 028 029 501.XP 502.XP 503.XP 504.XP 505.XP
8.JMP 4 001 002 003 004
8.Lab 11 001.Excel 001.JMP 001.Minitab 001.R 001.SPSS 001.TI 002.Excel 002.JMP 002.Minitab 002.R 002.SPSS
8.TB 8 005 010 013 014 019 024 031 034
Chapter 9: Plots, Graphs, and Pictures
9.CQ 6 001 002 003 004 005 006
9.E 30 001 002 003 004 005 006 007 008 009 010 013 014 015 016 017 018 019 020 021 022 024 025 026 027 028 501.XP 502.XP 503.XP 504.XP 505.XP
9.JMP 4 001 002 003 004
9.Lab 5 001.Excel 001.JMP 001.Minitab 001.R 001.SPSS
9.SIP 1 001
9.TB 8 004 011 013 023 025 041 050 058
Chapter 10: Relationships Between Measurement Variables
10.CQ 10 001 002 003 004 005 006 007 008 009 010
10.E 34 001 002 003 004 005 006 007 008 009 010 011 012 013 014 015 016 017 018 019 020 021 022 023 024 025 026 027 028 029 501.XP 502.XP 503.XP 504.XP 505.XP
10.JMP 7 001 002 003 004 005 006 007
10.SIP 3 001 002 003
10.TB 9 003 009 010 014 020 022 023 030 033
Chapter 11: Relationships Can Be Deceiving
11.E 34 001 002 003 005 006 007 008 009 010 011 012 013 014 015 016 017 019 020 021 022 023 024 025 026 027 028 029 030 031 501.XP 502.XP 503.XP 504.XP 505.XP
11.TB 7 006 007 010 015 021 025 034
Chapter 12: Relationships Between Categorical Variables
12.E 38 001 002 003 004 005 006 007 008 009 010 011 012 013 014 015 016 017 019 020 021 022 023 024 025 026 027 028 029 030 031 032 036 037 501.XP 502.XP 503.XP 504.XP 505.XP
12.TB 7 007 009 010 019 024 026 031
Chapter 13: Statistical Significance for 2 × 2 Tables
13.CQ 4 001 002 003 004
13.E 40 001 002 003 004 005 006 007 008 009 010 011 012 013 014 015 016 017 018 019 020 021 022 023 024 025 026 027 028 029 030 031 032 033 034 035 036 037 501.XP 502.XP 503.XP
13.JMP 3 001 002 003
13.Lab 6 001.Excel 001.JMP 001.Minitab 001.R 001.SPSS 001.TI
13.SIP 1 001
13.TB 7 006 009 011 017 022 029 032
Chapter 14: Understanding Probability and Long-Term Expectations
14.CQ 13 001 002 003 004 005 006 007 008 009 010 011 012 013
14.E 36 001 002 003 004 005 006 007 009 010 011 012 013 014 015 016 017 018 019 020 021 022 023 024 025 026 027 028 029 030 031 032 034 501.XP 502.XP 503.XP 504.XP
14.JMP 4 001 002 003 004
14.TB 9 009 010 011 016 023 025 028 037 041
Chapter 15: Understanding Uncertainty through Simulation
15.CQ 3 001 002 003
15.E 25 001 002 003 004 005 006 007 008 009 010 011 012 013 014 015 016 017 018 019 020 021 022 023 501.XP 502.XP
Chapter 16: Psychological Influences on Personal Probability
16.E 24 001 002 003 004 005 006 007 008 009 010 011 012 013 014 015 017 018 019 021 022 023 024 501.XP 502.XP
Chapter 17: When Intuition Differs from Relative Frequency
17.CQ 2 001 002
17.E 27 001 002 003 004 005 007 008 009 010 011 012 013 014 015 016 018 019 020 021 022 023 024 026 027 028 029 501.XP
17.TB 7 009 012 015 023 024 025 029
Chapter 18: Understanding the Economic News
18.E 25 001 002 003 004 005 006 008 009 010 011 012 013 015 016 017 018 019 020 021 022 023 024 025 501.XP 502.XP
Chapter 19: The Diversity of Samples from the Same Population
19.CQ 8 001 002 003 004 005 006 007 008
19.E 21 001 002 003 004 007 008 009 010 011 012 013 014 015 016 017 018 019 020 501.XP 502.XP 503.XP
19.Lab 6 001.Excel 001.JMP 001.Minitab 001.R 001.SPSS 001.TI
19.SIP 1 001
19.TB 6 022 023 029 036 038 046
Chapter 20: Estimating Proportions with Confidence
20.E 27 001 002 003 004 005 006 007 008 009 010 012 013 014 015 016 017 018 019 020 021 022 023 024 025 026 501.XP 502.XP
20.JMP 3 001 002 003
20.Lab 6 001.Excel 001.JMP 001.Minitab 001.R 001.SPSS 001.TI
20.TB 5 005 007 015 026 027
Chapter 21: The Role of Confidence Intervals in Research
21.CQ 12 001 002 003 004 005 006 007 008 009 010 011 012
21.E 33 001 003 004 005 006 007 008 009 010 011 012 013 014 015 016 017 018 019 020 021 022 023 024 025 026 027 028 029 030 031 032 501.XP 502.XP
21.JMP 14 001 002 003 004 005 006 007 008 009 010 011 012 013 014
21.Lab 12 001.Excel 001.JMP 001.Minitab 001.R 001.SPSS 001.TI 002.Excel 002.JMP 002.Minitab 002.R 002.SPSS 002.TI
21.SIP 1 001
21.TB 5 018 019 020 028 037
Chapter 22: Rejecting Chance—Testing Hypotheses in Research
22.E 27 001 002 003 004 005 006 007 008 009 010 011 012 013 014 015 016 017 019 020 021 022 024 025 026 501.XP 502.XP 503.XP
22.JMP 6 001 002 003 004 005 006
22.SIP 3 001 002 003
22.TB 5 006 007 014 039 040
Chapter 23: Hypothesis Testing—Examples and Case Studies
23.CQ 18 001 002 003 004 005 006 007 008 009 010 011 012 013 014 015 016 017 018
23.E 33 001 002 004 005 006 007 008 009 010 011 012 013 014 015 016 017 018 019 020 021 022 023 024 025 026 027 028 029 030 031 032 501.XP 502.XP
23.JMP 14 001 002 003 004 005 006 007 008 009 010 011 012 013 014
23.Lab 12 001.Excel 001.JMP 001.Minitab 001.R 001.SPSS 001.TI 002.Excel 002.JMP 002.Minitab 002.R 002.SPSS 002.TI
23.SIP 3 001 002 003
23.TB 4 004 011 021 022
Chapter 24: Significance, Importance, and Undetected Differences
24.E 32 001 002 003 004 005 006 007 008 009 010 011 012 013 014 015 016 017 018 019 020 021 022 023 025 026 027 028 029 030 031 501.XP 502.XP
24.TB 6 005 006 013 024 030 037
Chapter 25: Meta-Analysis: Resolving Inconsistencies across Studies
25.E 16 001 002 003 006 007 008 009 010 011 012 013 014 015 016 017 501.XP
Chapter 26: Ethics in Statistical Studies
26.E 21 002 003 004 006 007 008 009 010 011 012 013 014 015 016 017 018 019 020 021 501.XP 502.XP
Chapter 27: Putting What You Have Learned to the Test
27.TB 6 006 007 012 013 046 047
Total 1254