Traffic and Highway Engineering (SI Edition) 5th edition

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Nicholas J. Garber and Lester A. Hoel
Publisher: Cengage Learning

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  • Garber and Hoel Traffic and Highway Engineering 5e - SI Edition

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  • Chapter 1: The Profession of Transportation
    • 1.1: Importance of Transportation (5)
    • 1.2: Transportation History (9)
    • 1.3: Transportation Employment (8)
    • 1.4: Summary
    • 1: Problems

  • Chapter 2: Transportation Systems and Organizations
    • 2.1: Developing a Transportation System (2)
    • 2.2: Modes of Transportation (12)
    • 2.3: Transportation Organizations (8)
    • 2.4: Summary
    • 2: Problems

  • Chapter 3: Characteristics of the Driver, the Pedestrian, the Bicyclist, the Vehicle, and the Road
    • 3.1: Driver Characteristics (3)
    • 3.2: Perception-Reaction Process
    • 3.3: Older Drivers' Characteristics (1)
    • 3.4: Pedestrian Characteristics (1)
    • 3.5: Bicyclists' and Bicycle Characteristics
    • 3.6: Vehicle Characteristics (15)
    • 3.7: Road Characteristics (5)
    • 3.8: Summary
    • 3: Problems

  • Chapter 4: Traffic Engineering Studies
    • 4.1: Spot Speed Studies (8)
    • 4.2: Volume Studies (2)
    • 4.3: Methods for Conducting Spot Speed and Volume Studies (3)
    • 4.4: Presentation and Analysis of Spot Speed data (7)
    • 4.5: Types of Volume Counts and Analysis of Volume Data (5)
    • 4.6: Travel Time and Delay Studies (2)
    • 4.7: Parking Studies (5)
    • 4.8: Summary
    • 4: Problems

  • Chapter 5: Highway Safety
    • 5.1: Issues Involved in Transportation Safety (1)
    • 5.2: Strategic Highway Safety Plans (9)
    • 5.3: Performance Measures (10)
    • 5.4: Computational Procedures for Safety Effectiveness Evaluation Methods (1)
    • 5.5: Crash Patterns (1)
    • 5.6: Effectiveness of Safety Design Features (1)
    • 5.7: Safety Effectiveness of Some Commonly Used Highway Design Features
    • 5.8: Safety Effects of Pedestrian Facilities (1)
    • 5.9: Safety Effects of Traffic Calming Strategies
    • 5.10: Safety Impact of Intelligent Transportation Systems (ITS)
    • 5.11: Summary
    • 5: Problems

  • Chapter 6: Fundamental Principles of Traffic Flow
    • 6.1: Traffic Flow Elements (1)
    • 6.2: Flow-Density Relationships (13)
    • 6.3: Shock Waves in Traffic Streams (6)
    • 6.4: Gap and Gap Acceptance (2)
    • 6.5: Introduction to Queuing Theory (5)
    • 6.6: Summary
    • 6: Problems

  • Chapter 7: Intersection Design
    • 7.1: Types of at-Grade Intersections (4)
    • 7.2: Design Principles for at-Grade Intersections (21)
    • 7.3: Design of Railroad Grade Crossings (3)
    • 7.4: Summary
    • 7: Problems

  • Chapter 8: Intersection Control
    • 8.1: General Concepts of Traffic Control
    • 8.2: Conflict Points at Intersections (1)
    • 8.3: Types of Intersection Control (7)
    • 8.4: Signal Timing for Different Color Indications (15)
    • 8.5: Freeway Ramps (2)
    • 8.6: Evaluation and Optimization of Intersection Timing Plans
    • 8.7: Summary
    • 8: Problems

  • Chapter 9: Capacity and Level of Service for Highway Segments
    • 9.1: Freeways (9)
    • 9.2: Multilane Highways (2)
    • 9.3: Two-Lane Highways (11)
    • 9.4: Summary
    • 9: Problems

  • Chapter 10: Capacity and Level of Service at Signalized Intersections
    • 10.1: Definitions of Some Common Terms (1)
    • 10.2: Analysis Levels and Performance Measures for Level of Service at Signalized Intersections
    • 10.3: Level of Service Criteria at Signalized Intersections (3)
    • 10.4: Methodology of Operational Analysis for the Automobile Mode (4)
    • 10.5: Computation of Pedestrian and Bicycle Factors (flpb, frpb) for Right- and Left-Turn Movements from One-Way Streets
    • 10.6: Computation of Pedestrians and Bicycles Factor (flpb), for Protected or Protected-Permitted Left-Turn Movements on Two-Way Streets
    • 10.7: Determination of Lane Group Adjusted Saturation Flow Rate (1)
    • 10.8: Lane Group Capacity
    • 10.9: Level of Service Computation for Pedestrian Mode (1)
    • 10.10: Level of Service for Bicycle Mode
    • 10.11: Quick Estimation Method (QEM)
    • 10.12: Field Determination of Saturation Flow
    • 10.13: Summary
    • 10: Problems

  • Chapter 11: The Transportation Planning Process.
    • 11.1: Basic Elements of Transportation Planning (6)
    • 11.2: Transportation Planning Institutions (4)
    • 11.3: Urban Transportation Planning (7)
    • 11.4: Forecasting Travel (9)
    • 11.5: Summary
    • 11: Problems

  • Chapter 12: Forecasting Travel Demand
    • 12.1: Demand Forecasting Approaches (2)
    • 12.2: Trip Generation (3)
    • 12.3: Trip Distribution (14)
    • 12.4: Mode Choice (3)
    • 12.5: Traffic Assignment (5)
    • 12.6: Other Methods for Forecasting Demand (1)
    • 12.7: Estimating Freight Demand
    • 12.8: Traffic Impact Studies
    • 12.9: Summary
    • 12: Problems

  • Chapter 13: Evaluating Transportation Alternatives
    • 13.1: Basic Issues in Evaluation (3)
    • 13.2: Evaluation Based on Economic Criteria (15)
    • 13.3: Evaluation Based on Multiple Criteria (6)
    • 13.4: Summary
    • 13: Problems

  • Chapter 14: Highway Surveys and Location
    • 14.1: Principles of Highway Location (4)
    • 14.2: Highway Survey Methods (10)
    • 14.3: Highway Earthwork and Final Plans (3)
    • 14.4: Summary
    • 14: Problems

  • Chapter 15: Geometric Design of Highway Facilities
    • 15.1: Factors Influencing Highway Design (3)
    • 15.2: Design of the Alignment (20)
    • 15.3: Special Facilities for Heavy Vehicles on Steep Grades
    • 15.4: Bicycle Facilities (2)
    • 15.5: Parking Facilities (1)
    • 15.6: Computer Use in Geometric Design
    • 15.7: Summary
    • 15: Problems

  • Chapter 16: Highway Drainage
    • 16.1: Surface Drainage (2)
    • 16.2: Highway Drainage Structures
    • 16.3: Sediment and Erosion Control (1)
    • 16.4: Hydrologic Considerations (9)
    • 16.5: Unit Hydrographs
    • 16.6: Hydraulic Design of Highway Drainage Structures (8)
    • 16.7: Subsurface Drainage (3)
    • 16.8: Summary
    • 16: Problems

  • Chapter 17: Soil Engineering for Highway Design
    • 17.1: Soil Characteristics
    • 17.2: Basic Engineering Properties of Soils (9)
    • 17.3: Classification of Soils for Highway Use (10)
    • 17.4: Soil Surveys for Highway Construction (1)
    • 17.5: Soil Compaction (2)
    • 17.6: Special Soil Tests for Pavement Design
    • 17.7: Frost Action in Soils
    • 17.8: Summary
    • 17: Problems

  • Chapter 18: Bituminous Materials
    • 18.1: Sources of Asphalt (1)
    • 18.2: Description and Uses of Bituminous Binders (1)
    • 18.3: Properties of Asphalt Materials (1)
    • 18.4: Tests for Asphalt Materials (1)
    • 18.5: Asphalt Mixtures (9)
    • 18.6: Superpave Systems (3)
    • 18.7: Summary
    • 18: Problems

  • Chapter 19: Design of Flexible Highway Pavements
    • 19.1: Structural Components of a Flexible Pavement (1)
    • 19.2: Soil Stabilization (2)
    • 19.3: General Principles of Flexible Pavement Design (16)
    • 19.4: Summary
    • 19: Problems

  • Chapter 20: Design of Rigid Pavements
    • 20.1: Materials Used in Rigid Pavements (3)
    • 20.2: Joints in Concrete Pavements (1)
    • 20.3: Types of Rigid Highway Pavements (1)
    • 20.4: Pumping of Rigid Pavements (1)
    • 20.5: Stresses in Rigid Pavements (7)
    • 20.6: Thickness Design of Rigid Pavements (14)
    • 20.7: Summary
    • 20: Problems

  • Chapter 21: Pavement Management
    • 21.1: Problems of Highway Rehabilitation (2)
    • 21.2: Methods for Determining Roadway Condition (9)
    • 21.3: Pavement Condition Prediction (2)
    • 21.4: Pavement Rehabilitation (4)
    • 21.5: Pavement Rehabilitation Programming (1)
    • 21.6: GIS and Pavement Management
    • 21.7: Summary
    • 21: Problems


The enhanced edition of Garber and Hoel's best-selling Traffic and Highway Engineering 5th Edition, provides insights into all facets of traffic and highway engineering. Students examine the pivotal role transportation plays today along with its historical impact. They explore the creation of employment opportunities and transportation's influence on daily lives. With this approach, students gain an understanding of the field as well as an appreciation for its challenges. Later chapters focus on specific issues facing contemporary transportation engineers. Effective learning tools such as worked problems, diagrams and tables, reference material, and realistic examples demonstrate how to apply concepts. Available via WebAssign is MindTap Reader, Cengage's next-generation eBook, and other digital resources.

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Group Quantity Questions
Chapter 1: The Profession of Transportation
1.1 5 001 003 006 008 009
1.2 9 004 005 007 010 017 018 019 020 021
1.3 8 002 011 012 013 014 015 016 022
Chapter 2: Transportation Systems and Organizations
2.1 2 001 002
2.2 12 003 004 005 006 007 008 009 010 019 020 021 022
2.3 8 011 012 013 014 015 016 017 018
Chapter 3: Characteristics of the Driver, the Pedestrian, the Bicyclist, the Vehicle, and the Road
3.1 3 001 002 003
3.3 1 004
3.4 1 005
3.6 15 006 007 008 009 010 011 012 013 014 015 016 017 018 019 020
3.7 5 021 022 023 024 025
Chapter 4: Traffic Engineering Studies
4.1 8 002 003 004 005 006 007 010 012
4.2 2 011 013
4.3 3 001 031 032
4.4 7 008 009 024 026 027 029 030
4.5 5 014 015 025 028 033
4.6 2 016 018
4.7 5 019 020 021 022 023
Chapter 5: Highway Safety
5.1 1 001
5.2 9 002 003 004 005 006 012 015 020 021
5.3 10 008 009 010 011 013 014 017 018 019 023
5.4 1 007
5.5 1 016
5.6 1 022
5.8 1 024
Chapter 6: Fundamental Principles of Traffic Flow
6.1 1 001
6.2 13 002 003 004 005 006 007 008 009 010 011 012 013 015
6.3 6 014 016 017 021 024 025
6.4 2 022 023
6.5 5 018 019 020 026 027
Chapter 7: Intersection Design
7.1 4 002 003 007 017
7.2 21 001 004 005 006 008 009 010 011 012 013 014 015 016 018 019 020 021 022 023 024 025
7.3 3 026 027 028
Chapter 8: Intersection Control
8.2 1 001
8.3 7 002 003 007 008 009 010 011
8.4 15 004 005 006 012 013 014 015 016 017 018 019 020 021 022 023
8.5 2 024 025
Chapter 9: Capacity and Level of Service for Highway Segments
9.1 9 001 002 003 004 005 006 007 008 009
9.2 2 010 011
9.3 11 012 013 014 015 016 017 018 019 020 021 022
Chapter 10: Capacity and Level of Service at Signalized Intersections
10.1 1 010
10.3 3 001 002 003
10.4 4 004 005 006 007
10.7 1 008
10.9 1 009
Chapter 11: The Transportation Planning Process.
11.1 6 001 002 003 004 005 006
11.2 4 007 008 009 024
11.3 7 010 011 012 014 015 023 025
11.4 9 016 017 018 019 020 021 022 026 027
Chapter 12: Forecasting Travel Demand
12.1 2 001 002
12.2 3 003 004 005
12.3 14 006 007 008 009 010 011 012 013 014 015 016 017 018 019
12.4 3 020 021 022
12.5 5 024 025 026 027 028
12.6 1 023
Chapter 13: Evaluating Transportation Alternatives
13.1 3 001 002 003
13.2 15 004 005 006 007 008 009 010 011 012 013 014 015 016 017 018
13.3 6 019 020 021 022 023 024
Chapter 14: Highway Surveys and Location
14.1 4 001 002 003 006
14.2 10 004 005 007 008 009 010 011 012 013 014
14.3 3 015 016 017
Chapter 15: Geometric Design of Highway Facilities
15.1 3 001 002 003
15.2 20 004 005 006 007 008 009 010 011 012 013 014 015 016 017 018 019 020 021 022 023
15.4 2 024 025
15.5 1 026
Chapter 16: Highway Drainage
16.1 2 001 002
16.3 1 003
16.4 9 004 005 006 007 008 009 010 011 012
16.6 8 013 014 015 016 017 018 019 020
16.7 3 021 022 023
Chapter 17: Soil Engineering for Highway Design
17.2 9 001 002 003 004 005 006 007 008 009
17.3 10 010 011 012 013 014 015 016 017 018 019
17.4 1 022
17.5 2 020 021
Chapter 18: Bituminous Materials
18.1 1 001
18.2 1 003
18.3 1 002
18.4 1 004
18.5 9 005 006 007 008 009 010 011 012 013
18.6 3 014 015 016
Chapter 19: Design of Flexible Highway Pavements
19.1 1 001
19.2 2 002 003
19.3 16 004 005 006 007 008 009 010 011 012 013 014 015 016 017 018 019
Chapter 20: Design of Rigid Pavements
20.1 3 001 002 003
20.2 1 005
20.3 1 004
20.4 1 006
20.5 7 007 008 009 010 011 012 013
20.6 14 014 015 016 017 018 019 020 021 022 023 024 025 026 027
Chapter 21: Pavement Management
21.1 2 001 002
21.2 9 003 004 005 006 007 008 009 010 012
21.3 2 011 013
21.4 4 014 015 016 018
21.5 1 017
Total 483